Social Media

Much thought and deliberation is occurring over when, how and if big brands should employ social media.  While Twittering today, I found ab interesting tweet regarding a new study being released by Razorfish on this topic.  I copied and pasted some of what I thought were the best insights below.  As an aside, I will be speaking on this topic this Wednesday on Fox Business News…thoughts welcome!

The folks at Razorfish just released a report called “Fluent: The Razorfish Social Influence Marketing Report” that entrepreneurs and marketers need to read. It examines how social media influences purchase decisions, how social features are entering online advertising, and how social media is becoming a paid distribution mechanism. The implications for you are:

Social Media LogosThe folks at Razorfish just released a report called “Fluent: The Razorfish Social Influence Marketing Report” that entrepreneurs and marketers need to read. It examines how social media influences purchase decisions, how social features are entering online advertising, and how social media is becoming a paid distribution mechanism. The implications for you are:

  • Brands must socialize with their customers because “top-down” advertising isn’t going to work.
  • Brand must develop a credible voice along the parameters of engagement, humility, and authenticity.
  • Brands must make their social relationships more symmetrical–that is, with value for both the brand and the customer.
The report also includes this gem of a list of how brands should use Twitter:
  1. Become familiar with Twitter by reviewing, or following, the activities of successful brands such as Dell (dell.com/twitter), Zappos (twitter.com/zappos) and Comcast (twitter.com/comcastcares).
  2. Listen to what is already being said on Twitter about your brand.
  3. Identify initial objectives for using Twitter, including what would qualify as a Twitter success story for your brand.
  4. Look into competitive activities and potential legal considerations, especially if there is already a Twitter account that uses your brand’s name or other intellectual property associated with it.
  5. Use the findings to decide on the appropriate opportunitysuch as offers or community building, tone of voice and method of engagement–that may be right for your brand.
  6. Since Twitter is an ongoing activity–even if your company is only listening in–dedicate a resource to monitor the conversations and competitors.
  7. Map out a plan for the content you will share, including valuable initial content to pique user interest.
  8. Integrate your Twitter account throughout your marketing experience, by embedding it as a feed on the company Web site, including its URL in communications and so forth.
  9. Maintain momentum by following everyone who follows you, responding to queries and joining in conversations without being too marketing oriented.
  10. Provide ongoing direct value through your tweets by continuing to listen, learn and fine- tune your Twitter activities.

All in all, a valuable read. Click here to download the report.

One comment

  1. Totally agree with the post, interestingly Wall marts social networking venture has been analyzed as nothing but slapping their page on Facebook. Most companies I believe are being a target of brand clutter, forgetting why consumers in the first place became loyal customers. Focus on the key values and then roll out a marketing and branding plan including social networking and make the customer feel that their brand is with them like friend in cyber space.

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